Static Shot

Static Shot

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Thu. 03 December 2020 — 20h

Opéra national de Lorraine

Fri. 04 December 2020 — 20h30

Opéra national de Lorraine

Tue. 08 December 2020 — 20h

Opéra national de Lorraine

Thu. 31 December 2020 — 20h30

Orléans - Scène nationale

Fri. 01 January 2021 — 17h

Orléans - Scène nationale

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Premiere on December 3, 2020 at the Opéra national de Lorraine

40 MINUTES
24 DANCERS

Choreography
Maud Le Pladec
Choreographer assistant
Régis Badel
Music
Chloé Thévenin and Pete Harden
Costumes design
Christelle Kocher – KOCHÉ
Costumes assistants
Laure Mahéo and Carles Urraca Serra - KOCHÉ
Lights
Eric Soyer
Choreography
Maud Le Pladec
Choreographer assistant
Régis Badel
Music
Chloé Thévenin and Pete Harden
Costumes design
Christelle Kocher – KOCHÉ
Costumes assistants
Laure Mahéo and Carles Urraca Serra - KOCHÉ
Lights
Eric Soyer

Thu. 03 December 2020 — 20h

Fri. 04 December 2020 — 20h30

Tue. 08 December 2020 — 20h

Thu. 31 December 2020 — 20h30

Fri. 01 January 2021 — 17h

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«STATIC SHOT is my next choreographic project for the dancers of the Ballet de Lorraine. This work which will premiere in 2020 is based on an amazing artistic experience I had for the first time a few months ago: dance and film together. The director Valérie Donzelli invited me to participate and collaborate on her feature, “Notre-Dame,” a danced fiction which will be released next season. The experience fascinated me both personally and artistically, but I hadn’t imagined how much this encounter would reveal a new and pressing desire for me to explore my practice through the 7th art, but without – for example – projecting images during my pieces. No, it’s on a sensitive, conceptual and intellectual level that this all hit me; the resonances of this new aesthetic experience allowed me to begin a new reflection about the body and its representations, but also to continue my research into danced movement.» 

Maud Le Pladec

THE STRUCTURE OF LIVING CINEMA 

«In my work, I situate dance on the side of abstraction and composition, my research was guided by a form of logical rationality: notation, combination, algorithms driving a purely subjective and empirical approach. Words like fiction, narration, story telling, images, situation, characters, histories, emotions (…), which belong more or less to my vocabulary and the lexical range of my creation. And yet, dance is such fertile ground for fiction! And if it has been involved with film over the past few decades, it’s because it teases the promise of a new body, a developing body, one to be constructed, one which comes together and falls apart, a body which transforms itself, represents itself. And from that point there are certain questions: how can we bring together two mediums, dance and film, so close yet so different? What modalities are involved? Where exactly is the right point of view? 

For STATIC SHOT, I am imagining a specific sort of set, something between a dance piece, a stage installation and a film set, using a still shot or a sequence of shots, an enclosed space or a fixed frame in which the “camera,” movement and perspective, never stops. In other words, an immobile journey of sorts. The plasticity of the images, the representation of the bodies, but also the energy and the flow are essential on this stage, where the dancing, extremely precise, high intensity, never comes down, never diminishes. Nuances, ranging from the mezzo forte to fortississimo, will make this piece a nearly permanent crescendo, an invitation to the audience to step into unending ecstasy. 

The dramaturgy of the work, conceived as a mass of bodies, images and sounds, will have neither beginning, ending or mid-section. The dancers (I am hoping for 18-24 of them right now) are channeling a permanent climax, racing toward this high, their energy constantly at its highest point. How will we deal with the tension, the ecstasy, the collective orgasm? But there will also be relaxation, breath, dissipation. In STATIC SHOT it will all be about bodies, how they interact, how they don’t interact, how they go beyond, how they move, how they live or survive, how they let go, how they attract each other, how they mingle, bump into each other, how they sweat, how they transform themselves and do not die (…) Behind a simple pitch or situation, such as a moment of panic, a party, an assembly (…) are more complex questions: ‘What happens if I enjoy myself too much? What is the anguish of ecstasy? What happens if pleasure becomes a reason for tension?’ (…) Dance can show these changes as well as the preservation of certain states.» 

Maud Le Pladec

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Maud Le Pladec

Having studied at the exerce program at the Centre chorégraphique national in Montpellier, Maud Le Pladec danced with several choreographers, among them Georges Appaix, Loïc Touzé, Mathilde Monnier, Mette Ingvartsen and Boris Charmatz. In 2010, she created her first work Professor, the first part of a diptych based on the music of Fausto Romitelli, then in 2011, she created the second part, Poetry. In 2013, Maud Le Pladec was awarded a prestigious Hors les Murs program grant from the French Institute, doing research in New York on post‑minimalist American music, which was the basis for Democracy with the Ensemble TaCtuS and Concrete with the Ensemble Ictus. In 2015, she began a new cycle of creations based on the use of words, creating Hunted with the New York performance artist Okwui Okpokwasili. In 2016, she worked with the National Opera of Paris on Eliogabalo with the director Thomas Jolly, under the musical direction of Leonardo Garcia Alarcon. At the same time, Le Pladec was an Associated Artist at La Briqueterie – CDCN du Val de Marne. Beginning in January of 2017, she replaced Josef Nadj as Director of the CCN of Orléans. She then created Borderline with the director Guy Cassiers, Moto-Cross and Twenty-seven perspectives for the 2018 Festival Montpellier Danse. In May 2020, she will present a new creation with the CCN - Ballet de Lorraine: STATIC SHOT